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General & Process
  • Industrial rubber recycling is almost as old as industrial rubber manufacturing itself. Recycling still made strong, short-term economic sense well into the 20th Century because rubber, natural or synthetic, was expensive. In 1910, an ounce of rubber cost the same as an ounce of silver. That's one reason the average recycled content of all rubber products was over 50 percent well into the 20th Century.
  • The waste materials are chopped to 300400mm pieces; then the chopped rubber is fed in batches to charge casks; the casks  are automatically conveyed to the charging chamber; the materials are then supplied from the charging chamber to the thermolysis reactor, to be exposed to heating by a ubiquitous and inexpensive heat-carrying medium during 90 minutes. At this processing stage the rubber waste materials are thermally decomposed into gaseous and solid products. 

  • The gas products are then supplied from the thermolysis chamber to the separators, to be cooled; the condensed fluid flows into the separation unit, in which the oil products of thermolysis are separated from water and supplied to the collector unit, then poured to tanks. 10% of the collected oil is used as power supply for the recycling plant. The water is filtered, whereupon fed back to the processing cycle. The non-condensable combustible gas is burnt in the furnace to provide the heat supply for the reactor chamber. The solid products are conveyed to the discharge chamber, to be cooled to 100 170C, whereupon they are unloaded into the sorting machine that separates metal from the carbon residue.

Technology

  • A new material recycling  technology for crosslinked rubber was developed using the continuous reactive processing method. In this process of producing reclaimed rubber; breakage of crosslinking points in the crosslinked rubber occurs selectively under the controls of shear stress, reaction temperature and internal pressure in a modular screw type reactor. Deodorization during the process has also become possible by a newly developed method. The reclaimed rubber obtained from rubber waste generated from both manufacturing products and post-consumer products shows excellent mechanical properties applicable to new rubber compounds.

Report

  • Recovery Technology Inc. of Mississauga, Extruda-Rail of Calgary, and Exxadon/EWMC are Canada's high-technology tire-recycling companies. Recovery Technology has developed a new process for the conversion of steel-belted tires to rubber crumb. This technology, which recovers 98% of the useable rubber from the steel, carbon, and fabric components, has been licensed world-wide. This company also produces matting materials for the industrial workplace and for animal stalls and enclosures. Extruda-Rail holds international patents on a process it developed to convert rubber crumb into lengths of extruded renewed rubber for use in such applications as railway crossing panels and the flange fillers that hold the rails. 
  • The company supplies the entire Canadian market but exports the majority of its production to the United States, Asia and Europe. Exxadon/EWMC has developed a microwave pyrolysis process leading to the marketing of the oil, carbon black and steel components of tires and has licensed its technology to other companies in North America, Europe, the Middle East and Russia. These large companies are doing relatively well in the tire-recycling business, as are some small companies that fill a specific market niche.

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